Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
November 28, 2022

Forty-three People Who Will Never Breathe Free Air Again Are Registered Tax Return Preparers

Also! Over 900 applicants had an incarceration date within the last 10 years received active or provisional PTINs and over 70% of those did not disclose their felony conviction.  

• 962 PTIN applicants on the IRS’s Prisoner File with an incarceration date within the last 10 years received active or provisional PTINs – 745 (77 percent) of the 962 applicants did not disclose the felony conviction. 
 
• 331 active or provisional PTIN holders were in prison when they received their PTINs. 
 
• 43 PTIN applicants are serving life sentences and received active/provisional PTINs.  
 
None of the 43 disclosed the felony conviction on the PTIN applications.  Eleven (26 percent) of the 43 indicated they had a qualifying professional certification and they received active PTINs; 32 (74 percent) received provisional PTINs. 
The IRS has decided that prisoners preparing tax returns isn't ideal so they're working on putting an ixnay on the jailbird prepared 1040s. 

[TIGTA via TaxProf]

Latest Accounting Jobs--Apply Now:

Have something to add to this story? Give us a shout by email, Twitter, or text/call the tipline at 202-505-8885. As always, all tips are anonymous.

Comments are closed.

Related articles

Exposure Drafts: A Very Taxing Thanksgiving

Listen to Oh My Fraud, a podcast by Caleb Newquist and Greg Kyte, and get free CPE through Earmark. And Exposure Drafts holiday cards are now available for purchase through Rubook Creative. Latest Accounting Jobs–Apply Now: Senior Accountant, Nonprofit clients Remote Posted 15 mins ago Operations Coordinator, CPA Firm Remote Posted 15 mins ago Remote Tax Manager Remote […]

The Widening of the Tax Gap is the IRS’s Fault, Says the IRS

Accounting Today reported on Friday: The estimated gross U.S. tax gap increased to $496 billion annually for tax years 2014 through 2016, a rise of over $58 billion from the prior estimate — and the Internal Revenue Service estimates the gross tax gap will rise to $540 billion for 2017-2019. “The increase in the tax […]