September 19, 2021

Hiring Watch ’21: The IRS Needs Help Taking Down Hollywood Tax Cheats

Outside of press releases about the IRS Criminal Investigation Unit busting people for money laundering and reminders that the taxpayer advocate released her latest lengthy report to Congress about how well (and not so well) the IRS is doing, we don’t get a lot of email from everyone’s favorite parody video maker.

But buried in our inbox this morning was an email from IRS-CI saying it was hiring special agents nationwide. Let’s take a look:

Bring Your Accounting Skills to the World’s Premier Financial Investigative Agency

IRS Criminal Investigation, the investigative and law enforcement arm of the IRS, is hiring! The announcement closes on July 20, 2021 and is for 288 special agent positions throughout the country. Interested applicants must apply through www.usajobs.gov (control number 606583400).

I’ve seen a lot of you posting on Fishbowl and Reddit recently about wanting to leave public accounting for the IRS and if it’s worth it. IRS-CI thinks you’ll think it is because they made it known in the job announcement that you could help bust celebrity tax cheats:

IRS Criminal Investigation is known for putting Al Capone behind bars for tax evasion but also many celebrities such as Mike ‘The Situation’ Sorrentino from Jersey Shore, Wesley Snipes, John Gotti, and Heidi Fleiss.

Let’s not forget Felicity Huffman and Lori Laughlin too! Moving on:

Investigations range from tax fraud to money laundering, cybercrimes, narcotics, and much more. The work is challenging and rewarding!

How rewarding? The email didn’t say anything about salary, but according to the job posting that is up on USAjobs.gov, pay ranges from $49,508 to $86,905 per year.

Other benefits include:

  • Eleven paid holidays;
  • Thirteen to 26 vacation days a year;
  • Thirteen sicks days a year;
  • Access to insurance programs that may be continued after retirement; and
  • Retirement program that includes employer-match contributions.

The job posting on USAjobs.gov also has the 125 or so locations where IRS-CI is hiring, which includes all the major metropolises; however, the IRS won’t pay for any relocation fees.

The duties of a special agent are:

  • Investigate violations of federal tax laws.
  • Obtain and analyze complex financial evidence.
  • Conduct surveillance, dignitary protection, and undercover operations.
  • Execute search and arrest warrants.
  • Identify and seize property used in, or acquired through, illegal activities.
  • Testify and assist the U.S. attorney during trial.

Time’s ticking, so polish up those resumes, people. More info can be found here.

Latest Accounting Jobs--Apply Now:

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2 Comments

  1. As a new graduate about 15 years ago I was interested in becoming a CI. Some of the agents even attended Meet the Firms type events in the Los Angeles area. Essentially you get to be an accountant with a badge and a gun. Pay was mediocre, but benefits seemed great. IRS was just never hiring for those positions back then, which is too bad because I would have been awesome at that job.

  2. The pay listed is partially accurate. Special Agents receive Law Enforcement Availability Pay which is an additional 25% above what is listed. Most Agents are making greater than $100k by their 4th or 5th year.

Comments are closed.

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