This Well-Dressed Accountant Is Making The Rest Of You Look Like Scrubs

If you recall an earlier conversation on GC, there are some concerns out there that you all don't dress too good. Personally, I couldn't care less and I'd rather you guys be a bunch of cheap scrubs as it shows you value pinching pennies over being indulgently fancy. Isn't that a quality one should value in CPAs?

Conveniently, one Toronto fashion columnist recently happened to bump into a 56-year-old chartered accountant who admires Cary Grant, Ralph Lauren and overpriced ties:

“I always just want to look clean and well-groomed, happy and healthy,” says Townley, attributing his no-nonsense approach to his late parents.

Describing his style as classic, yet preppy, Townley calls Cary Grant and Ralph Lauren his style icons. “Cary Grant for a classic look. Ralph Lauren for fabulous casual,” he explains.

When it comes to the question of style vs. comfort, he admits going for style first, although he firmly believes it’s possible to be both stylish and comfortable at once. Townley’s favourite places to shop include Brooks Brothers, Harry Rosen, Holt Renfrew, Hermès and Jos. A. Banks.

He is partial to vintage and appreciates fine accessories, owning several classic watches, an stash of eclectic cufflinks and “racks” of Hermès ties —his weakness.

“My great collection of Hermès ties represents various eras of my life, from my teens to now,” Townley says. But he is adamant that he’s not driven by designer labels. Still, his biggest piece of fashion advice? “Buy the best that you can afford. Classics are timeless,” Townley says.

I'm going to go out on a limb here and presume due to this guy's use of "fabulous" that he might not be entirely straight, which would completely explain his unnatural (for an accountant) approach to fashion.

 

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