October 4, 2022

We Might Have New PCAOB Member Nominees Soon, Someday, Maybe

pcaob-nominees-sec-jay-clayton

Just keeping it warm.

Dave Michaels reports at The Wall Street Journal that SEC Chairman Jay Clayton’s preferred choice to lead the PCAOB is rumored to be the same person everyone thought it would be:

SEC Chairman Jay Clayton wants William Duhnke to become the PCAOB’s next chairman, according to one of the people familiar with the matter. Mr. Duhnke is director of the Senate Rules Committee and a longtime aide to Sen. Richard Shelby (R., Ala.), who was formerly chairman of the Senate Banking Committee.

Duhnke’s name has been floating around the PCAOB chairmanship for years, especially since current chair James Doty has been such a thorn in the side of the Big 4.

The chair is only one of several board positions that are open or occupied by members whose terms have expired. Michaels reports that Chairman Clayton “is preparing to advance a slate of nominees,” although SEC itself is not a full strength; two commissioner nominees are still hung up in confirmation.

[WSJ]

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