If It Sounds Too Good to be True, It’s Probably a Pyramid Scheme

The SEC busted yet another alleged pyramid scheme, and this one implicated the cloud in their malfeasance:

The SEC alleges that three entities collectively operating under the business names WCM and WCM777 are posing as multi-level marketing companies in the business of selling third-party cloud computing services, which can include website hosting, data storage, and software support.  The entities are based in California and Hong Kong and controlled by “Phil” Ming Xu, who is a resident of Temple City, California. 

According to the SEC’s complaint filed in federal court in Los Angeles, WCM and WCM777 have raised more than $65 million since March 2013 by falsely promising tens of thousands of investors that the return on investment in the cloud services venture would be 100 percent or more in 100 days.  Investors were told they would receive “points” for making investments or enrolling other investors.  The points would be convertible into equity in initial public offerings of high-tech companies their money would help launch.  However, rather than building out cloud services or incubating high-tech companies, Xu and the WCM entities used investor funds to make Ponzi payments of purported investment returns to some investors.  They also spent investor money to purchase golf courses and other U.S.-based properties among other unauthorized expenditures.

Do you mean to tell me I am not going to be able to build my own business and make a ton of money like this guy promised?

The state of California was already more than aware something was fishy with these "alleged cloud services" as 99% of WCM's "income" came in the form of selling memberships (for nearly $2000) to suckers who fell for the Ponzi.

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