Of Course the IRS Had a Reason for Raiding Your Home

Earlier in the week we mentioned an Indiana man who was suing the Feds for wrongful death because his wife committed suicide after an IRS raid.

Well, it turns out that the raid wasn’t a training exercise.

A Huntertown man who federal authorities say earned more than $1.7 million in assets but did not report the earnings on income tax filings has been charged in a 23-count indictment by a federal grand jury seated in South Bend.

James A. Simon, 59, faces charges of filing false federal income tax returns, failure to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts, fraud involving private financial aid, and fraud involving federal financial aid, all for an alleged scheme that ran 2003-2006.

Through involvement with five separate businesses – foreign and domestic – Simon is alleged to have not reported funds obtained as earned income, but instead claimed monies as nontaxable loans and advances.

Simon spent all but about $50,000, the indictment alleges.

The wife might be better off.

IRS strikes back in 23-count indictment for Huntertown man [Fort Wayne News-Sentinel]

Earlier in the week we mentioned an Indiana man who was suing the Feds for wrongful death because his wife committed suicide after an IRS raid.

Well, it turns out that the raid wasn’t a training exercise.

A Huntertown man who federal authorities say earned more than $1.7 million in assets but did not report the earnings on income tax filings has been charged in a 23-count indictment by a federal grand jury seated in South Bend.

James A. Simon, 59, faces charges of filing false federal income tax returns, failure to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts, fraud involving private financial aid, and fraud involving federal financial aid, all for an alleged scheme that ran 2003-2006.

Through involvement with five separate businesses – foreign and domestic – Simon is alleged to have not reported funds obtained as earned income, but instead claimed monies as nontaxable loans and advances.

Simon spent all but about $50,000, the indictment alleges.

The wife might be better off.

IRS strikes back in 23-count indictment for Huntertown man [Fort Wayne News-Sentinel]

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