A Non-Comprehensive Ranking of Celebrity-Accountant Beefs

1. Rihanna vs. Berdon/Pete Gounis
Plenty of backstory and huffy comments here, but honestly, all you need to do is watch this NSFW video and know that this is best celebrity-accountant beef to-date:

2. Elton John vs. PwC
In terms of star power and egos, this beef should be #1, but the story itself is pretty meh, so that knocks it down a spot. John sued the firm along with a host of others for negligence back in 2000, but PwC ultimately prevailed, feeling vindicated, of course: "Auditors are not 'a bank of last resort,' available as a deep pocket." 

3. Patricia Cornwell vs. Anchin, Block, Anchin/Evan Snapper
Cornwell won $50.9 million in her lawsuit against ABA back in 2013 for negligence and breach of fiduciary duties. Among other things, Cornwell claimed that Evan Snapper, the principal in charge of her finances, cut a check for $5,000 to his own daughter as a bat mitzvah gift. Anchin won a re-trial in March 2014 after a judge "dismissed several claims based on legal technicalities."

4. Wesley Snipes, Goldie Hawn, Ron Howard, Martin Scorsese, Al Pacino, Natalie Portman, Carly Simon, Sylvester Stallone, Uma Thurman, Barbara Walters, Caroline Kennedy, Matt Lauer, et al. vs. Kenneth I. Starr
Starr's fourth marriage was to a stripper. Then he started a Ponzi scheme.

5. Brian McKnight vs. Vernon Brown & Company
McKinght says VB&C didn't pay his taxes for nearly a decade and then when the firm tried to clean up the mess:

In the lawsuit he claims Brown knew he screwed up and secretly contacted Congressman Henry Waxman and gave him a phony sob story that got Waxman to contact the IRS and get McKnight back on an installment plan.

McKnight says Brown was so bad he screwed up the installment plan and the taxes were never paid.

10 years, bro. Come on.

6. Kevin Durant vs. Joel Lynn Elliot
Durant's agent recommended Elliot to the Oklahoma City Thunder forward but it sounds like he was this guy was taking liberties with the personal expenses:

In one instance, K. Durant Enterprises paid for travel for Durant and other employees totaling more than $1 million. Some of that travel, however, was for personal reasons, but it was deducted as a business expense, the lawsuit said.

"In preparing a client's tax returns, a reasonable prudent accountant would have conducted a basic inquiry and sought documentation to confirm that each travel expensed for which a deduction was recorded was truly business related," the lawsuit said.

Yes, you would think so.

7. Khloe Kardashian vs. ???
Who gives a fuck.

Latest Accounting Jobs--Apply Now:

Have something to add to this story? Give us a shout by email, Twitter, or text/call the tipline at 202-505-8885. As always, all tips are anonymous.

Comments are closed.

Related articles

TIL There’s a ‘Hall of Tortured Souls’ Easter Egg In Excel and That Couldn’t Be More Appropriate For Accountants’ Favorite Tool

Endlessly scrolling my YouTube recommendations the other night in a desperate attempt to scrape up the tiniest shred of dopamine, I came across the video I’m about to share with you all. It’s about the “Hall of Tortured Souls,” an easter egg buried in Microsoft Office 1995. This website has been around for 12 years, […]