September 20, 2021

Restructuring

PwC Is a Name You Can Trust … Or So It Claims

Hey all you Trusty McTrustersons! Here’s an excerpt from a post Trusty Tim Ryan published today on LinkedIn explaining something new at PwC called The New Equation: What we know is that trust will be the defining factor in how businesses are able to achieve both profit and purpose – so in the US, we are aligning […]

BDO Slims Down to Four Regions, Names New National Heads of Assurance and Tax

Jay Duke will head up the assurance practice while Doug Sirotta will lead tax. They’ll both report to the most interesting CEO in the world.

The business line regional heads (chart below), who formerly reported to Jack Weisbaum, will now report report to Duke and Sirotta. Speaking of those regions, the Southeast Region (Florida, Georgia) will merge into the Atlantic and the Southwest (Texas and Tennessee) will join the Central. It all goes down on July 1. Messrs. Duke and Sirotta will give up their seats on the BDO Board of Directors to take their new national roles (demotion?).

SOMEWHAT RELATED: Christopher Tower, the head of assurance in the West, was one of the brainchildren behind the “Tattle on a Headhunter, Win a $5 Starbucks Card” idea. [BDO]

Region Assurance RBLL Tax RBLL
Northeast Alan Selitti Robert Pedersen
Atlantic Wayne Berson Wayne Corini
Central Steve Ferrara Paul Heiselmann
West Christopher Tower Rocky Cummings

Deloitte Consolidating Pacific, Central Regions

Deloitte CEO elect Joe Echevarria has informed the partners that a little bit of restructuring will be going down when he takes the big chair next week. The Pacific Southwest and Northern Pacific regions will create a new West region while the Midwest and North Central regions will form a new Central region. The three remaining – Northeast, Mid-America, and Southeast – will remain as is.

Optimizing our regional structure

To: The partners, principals, and directors of Deloitte

When I shared my overall organizational structure with you in February, I noted that I would make the development of the right management model for the regions a priority. Just last week, the Board ratified the decision to move from seven regions to five for FY12 onwards.

We will combine Pacific Southwest with Northern Pacific to create a new West region. By combining Midwest and North Central region we will create a new Central Region. Northeast, Mid-America, and Southeast regions are unchanged.

This decision is the outcome of a comprehensive, strategic review led by Chet Wood, leader of Markets and Offerings. The review was inclusive, with input from many perspectives, including LCSPs, line partners from each FSS, OMPs and RMPs, FSS CEOs and other members of the U.S. Executive. We looked at the regions through the strategic lens of our Lead from the Front framework, to determine how, at this time, we can best align our organization model to the external marketplace.

We carefully considered the different roles regions and offices play for each of our businesses; while many of our non-regulated services are increasingly delivered nationally, regions are critical to the service delivery of our Audit, Tax and DGES practices. Our review also considered factors such as the impact on spans of control, leadership and development opportunities, community-building and sense of partnership, infrastructure costs and speed of implementation. We defined the regional model that will best drive client and business growth, improve our strategic positioning, and strengthen our performance.

The new structure is effective from the start of FY12, although some tactical aspects of implementation may take longer to complete. I have asked Anne Taylor and Gary Tabach to lead the succession process for the West RMP, and Mark Edmunds to lead the process for the Central RMP.

With this improvement comes new opportunity. It’s up to us to realize it and turn our new regional structure to a business advantage. In every region and in every market where we operate, we must continue to widen the gap between us and our competitors, strengthen our position, and ensure that we stay out ahead of change. That is how we will continue to lead from the front.

Joe Echevarria
U.S. Chief Executive Officer Elect
Deloitte LLP

Since we’re not intimately familiar with the hierarchy at Deloitte (e.g. “Regional Partner Leader of M&A Advisory Services” or “Area OMP Chief Leader of Regional Assurance”) these changes will probably mean some jockeying for spots amongst partners effected by the consolidation. And since some regional leaders within the firm (i.e. Talyor, Tabach and Edmunds) will be watching over this process, maybe there will be potential for some interesting developments.

Rumor Mill: More Ernst & Young Restructuring Details

Thumbnail image for ey8ball.jpgWe’ve got a follow up to our post yesterday about E&Y’s restructuring plans for the North Central and Pacific regions.
A source has informed us that the Financial Services Office (“FSO”) began nationalizing non-audit banking and asset management clients earlier this year. Insurance clients are also going to be under FSO, which will centralize all non-audit financial services clients. Our source has further indicated that the next step is to nationalize the audit clients. The ulitmate goal is to slim the firm down to five total regions (West, Central, Southeast, Northeast, and FSO).
We asked a couple of sources about this particular rumor to get some opinions:

I do hope this is not true, as [FSO] can’t audit their way out of a paper bag. I’m not sure why they would make an interim step as they’re making now if there’s an ultimate goal of five sub-areas

Another view:

Running FSO out of NYC seems like a good call from an overhead…cost standpoint but that’s about it. I have heard horror stories about the kind of hours FSO staff typically pull year round. I don’t see this making the “people in the trenches” any happier. Having all the work routed to one place makes it easier…to make sure that work is getting done…Of course I think this is just going to turn FSO into more of a meat grinder than it already is since they are going to do everything they can to get as much work in the pipeline as possible to keep that group busy.

As we mentioned yesterday, E&Y would not comment on internal firm matters.
If you’re in the FSO practice and can attest or refute any of the above details (horror stories, meat grinders, auditing out of paper bags) or even if you’re not and have an opinion share your thoughts below.

Ernst & Young Restructuring Plans Affect North Central, Pacific Regions

Thumbnail image for ey8ball.jpgWe received several reports over the weekend and today about regional restructuring at Ernst & Young that will go into effect on January 1.
The majority of the North Central region will combine with the Mid-Atlantic region to form the new “East-Central” region, while the Toledo and Detroit offices will join the Midwest region. One source has told GC that this move is “an effort to reduce infrastructure and we should not be distracted from our client serving duties.”
We have also confirmed that the Pacific Northwest and Pacific Southwest regions will combine into a single “West” region. Again, sources indicating this move is an attempt to reduce overhead costs, saying “Lots a current senior leadership will be moved around,” as a result of this consolidation.
Both regions have seen significant layoffs just in the past month, and reports as recently as December 9th for the North Central. Some may go so far to say that the layoffs were a precursor to these plans but that’s speculative sport on our part.
We reached out to an E&Y Spokesperson who said that the firm prefers not to comment on internal matters.
E&Y’s restructuring follows a major restructuring at KPMG that we reported on earlier this year which saw several leadership changes and rumors of the firm consolidating down to two regions in the U.S.
One of our sources indicated that more news is expected this week so if you have any further details on these changes, get in touch with us, and discuss your thoughts in the comments.

KPMG Global Revenue Drops 11.4%

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for PomeranianSP1324.jpgThe wait is over Klynveldians. Your firm’s revenue results are out and — not to put fine a point on it — they’re disappointing.

The press release has the typical spin that we’ve come to expect from the Big 4 bigiwigs as Tim Flynn focuses on the, ‘high growth markets’ and the opportunities that arise out of ‘a markedly changed regulatory environment’ (code for: “Democrats are in power”).

These “opportunities” are noted but the numbers speak for themselves. As Big Four Blog notes, “A drop in revenue was expected, the surprise was the magnitude of the drop, which was higher than other Big4 firms.”


From the press release:

KPMG, the global network of professional service firms providing Audit, Tax and Advisory services, today announced member firm combined revenues totaling US$20.11 billion for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2009, versus US$22.69 billion for the prior fiscal year, representing an 11.4 percent decline in U.S. dollars.

“While overall revenue results for the 2009 fiscal year reflected the global economic downturn, we were pleased that our continued investments in high growth markets resulted in continued growth in those country member firms,” said Timothy P. Flynn, Chairman of KPMG International.

The drop in revenues breaks down like this:

Audit – $9.95 billion in FY09 versus $10.69 billion in FY08, a 6.9% decline in U.S. dollars.

Advisory – Revenues of $6.07 billion in FY09, versus $7.27 billion in FY08, a 16.6% decline in U.S. dollars.

Tax – $4.09 billion in FY09 compared with $4.73 billion in FY08, a 13.4% decline in U.S. dollars.

The numbers certainly speak to the tough year that KPMG professionals have witnessed through many rounds of layoffs and several shake-ups that appear to be part of major restructuring in the U.S.
So now that the 2009 earnings season has come to a close, all the firms can focus on making 2010 less crappy. That should be breeze. We shall see. If you’ve got thoughts on the Radio Station’s year, or want to talk about how psyched you are for 2010, discuss in the comments.

KPMG reports 2009 revenues of US$20.1 billion [Press Release]

See also: KPMG 2009 Revenues of $20 B Drop 11%, Most Among Big Four Firms [The Big Four Blog]

More KPMG Leadership Changes

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for PomeranianSP1324.jpgJust a brief update on KPMG leadership moves that we’ve been following.

Late Friday we learned that the office managing partner (“OMP”) of the New York office has been promoted to serve as the Vice Chair of Market Development. Our understanding is that all the OMPs across the country will report to this position and it will focus on 21 key markets in the U.S.

The former head of the New York Financial Services will move up as the new New York OMP. No word on who will fill the leadership role in NYFS.

This appears to be the first instance where the OMP was promoted to a national position as opposed to a “client-facing role”.

Continue to keep us updated with the latest on the comings and goings of the grand poobahs and discuss your thoughts on the progress of the restructuring in the comments.

Earlier GC coverage of KPMG Leadership Changes and Restructuring:
Another KPMG Shake-Up
KPMG Shake-up Continues
Rumor Mill: KPMG Restructuring Plans
(UPDATE 2) KPMG Atlanta Shake-up Makes Us Wonder

Another KPMG Shake-Up

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for PomeranianSP1324.jpgFollowing up on our earlier reports of leadership changes in several cities, — as well as the Southeast region — the Charlotte Business Journal is reporting that John Switzer now sits in the big chair of KPMG’s Charlotte office.
Swizter ascended to the new gig after serving as the managing partner of the Cleveland, Louisville, and Lexington offices.
This appears to be another restructuring switcheroo as Switzer’s predecessor, Paul Chapman, will be “[taking] a new role, serving some of the firm’s largest audit clients.”
As prestigious as that sounds, we’re inclined to believe that the bigwigs decided some fresh blood was needed in Ken Lewis land.
If you’ve got any news on freshly minted grand poobahs in your office, kindly pass along the details and feel free to speculate on the progress of the restructuring in the comments.
KPMG names managing partner [Charlotte Business Journal]

Rumor Mill: KPMG Restructuring Plans

Thumbnail image for PomeranianSP1324.jpgWe’ve finally received some details on a possible restructuring at the House of Klynveld in the U.S.
According to our source, the plans were announced over the past week on a series of calls by Tim Flynn. The firm would be consolidated down to two regions, East and West and each would have a regional managing partner and one service line managing partner per region.
This would result in the elimination of one level of regional leadership and would transfer several partners into client-facing roles.
The restructuring would also include placing some partners on ‘profit improvement plans’ and some layoffs would occur over the next year. Additional staff layoffs would occur across all ranks over the next year as well.
The bad news is obvious. The silver lining, as some of our other sources have indicated, is that the Firm would be eliminating at least one level of bureaucracy that should allow partners to be more active in developing potential client relationships.
Messages left with KPMG were not immediately returned. We’ll update you with any response that the firm gives us.
If you can expand on of the details we mentioned on this restructuring, let us know, otherwise, discuss your thoughts in the comments.
Earlier: KPMG Atlanta Shake-up Makes Us Wonder
UPDATE, 4:45 pm: Regardless of this rumor, we learned a short time ago that KPMG admitted thirty-six new partners last month. Seventeen in Audit, twelve in Tax, and seven in Advisory. Congrats to the new partners! No, seriously. Good job.