an actual study

Millennial Health Watch: Keep Extra Large Binder Clips Around, Just in Case

For the past few years, health experts have been warning anyone within earshot that all the sitting we've been doing will be the death of us all. In more recent health news pointed directly at soft and supple-handed white-collar professionals, your grip is being called into question: Young adults in the United States are losing […]

Deloitte Study: Accountants Don’t Have Fire in Their Bellies

Our AWEB colleague Jason Bramwell has the earth shattering results of Deloitte's Unlocking the Passion of the Explorer: In fall 2012, the Deloitte Center for the Edge surveyed approximately 3,000 full-time US workers who work more than thirty hours per week from fifteen industries and across various job levels for its Unlocking the Passion of the Explorer […]

People Are Having Babies Earlier to Max Out Tax Benefits

Naturally. Williams’s Sara LaLumia, the University of Chicago’s James Sallee and the Treasury Department’s Nicholas Turner took it upon themselves to figure out if policies like the Child Tax Credit (CTC), the dependent exemption and the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC, which is more generous for families with more children) are pushing mothers with due […]

Study: Progressive Taxation More Likely to Put a Smile on Your Face

[R]esearchers analyzed the relationship between tax progressivity and personal well-being in 54 nations surveyed by the Gallup Organization in 2007—a total of 59,634 respondents. Well-being was expressed in people’s assessments of their overall life quality, from “worst” to “best possible life,” on a scale of 1 to 10; and in whether they enjoyed positive daily experiences (such as smiling, being treated with respect, and eating good food) or suffered negative ones, including sadness, worry, and shame. Finally, the analysis looked at the participants’ satisfaction with their nation’s public goods, from schools to clean air. […] On average, residents of the nations with the most progressive taxation evaluated their own lives as closer to “the best possible.” They also reported having more satisfying experiences and fewer discomfiting ones than respondents living in nations with less progressive taxes. [via TaxProf]