Partners don’t get sick

Survey: 1 In 10 Professionals Say They Never Go to Work Sick, Are Full of Crap

I don’t know about you guys but I’ve never known a person who hasn’t come to work sick. Not that I condone it or think you should. The last thing you need is a colleague spreading germs by hacking up a lung in your face. But for one reason or another, we’ve all done it […]

Survey: Accountants’ Jobs Make Them Sick

Literally.

Almost two-thirds (63%) of accountants felt their firms should do more to support health and wellbeing, according to a new survey. More than half (55%) said their stress levels have increased over the past 12 months and 68% said their jobs have made them ill, citing stress as the main cause, Sovereign Health Care reports.

Chief executive Russ Piper said higher workloads combined with pay freezes have hit morale and dented employee contentment, noting 53% of accountants said they would change jobs for a better benefits package on the same salary.

Accountants bemoan unfeeling employers [Accountancy Age]

Apparently PwC Partners Aren’t Eligible for Anti-Bullying Protection

When you become a partner at a Big 4 firm, the culture rewards you with certain privileges. Some of these include: 1) the ability to strut out the door before 5 pm and no one gives you the stink eye; 2) stealing food out of the fridge without fear of retribution; 3) “Black” Starbucks cards; 4) private bathrooms that blast “You’re the Best” when you walk in the door, among others.

Unfortunately, it turns out that sometimes you lose some privileges when you take seat at the big table.

We previously mentioned Colin Tenner, who is suing PricewaterhouseCoopers for disability discrimination, alleging that he was fired after taking time off due to depression and anxiety. His suffering was caused, he claims, by a client bullying him (e.g. taking his lunch money, using emails as TP and returning them) and PwC’s mishandling of the situation.

His fellow partners weren’t buying it, claiming that he was a total wuss, “partners simply do not get sick” and possibly just faking it.


At first, we thought this sounded a little harsh but the Times Online is now reporting that there is a perfectly good explanation for partners’ reaction. They had a policy to back them up:

Mr Tenner, 45, said that a junior member of his team had raised a formal complaint against the same individual, which was investigated by PwC.

Although he complained about his treatment from the individual on several occasions over six months and had asked PwC to implement specific procedures in its anti-bullying policy, “nothing was done”, it is alleged.

Instead, Mr Tenner said, several senior managers told him that he was not protected by the anti-bullying policy because he was a partner.

Now this makes sense. Had this been one of P. Dubs’ rank and file, certainly there would have been hell to pay for this type of treatment by a client. But since a partner was involved, they figure your bully tolerance should be at such a keen level that no protection is necessary.

Bullying ‘did not apply’ to PwC partner [Times Online]