I’ll be taking first person in this one

Should a Tax Rockstar Transfer to a New Consulting Gig Prior to Busy Season?

Welcome to another MOANday edition of Accounting Career Emergencies. In today’s edition, a tax vet is looking to move into consulting with their current firm but in a new office. The current office wants this “star performer” to stick around for busy season but ultimately the decision lies with our hero, who is concerned about burning bridges if they jump before busy season starts. What’s a tax rockstar to do?

Recently had your heart broken? Are you a miserable auditor with no one to turn to? Or an overachiever who needs help convincing their colleagues that you’re not just some know-it-all? Email us at [email protected] and we’ll be your shoulder to cry on (and then slap some sense into you).

Back to the David Lee Roth of taxes:

Hi. I am currently with the tax department and thinking about doing a switch to consulting with my same firm, but a different office. The new position will offer better opportunities and as a bonus, better pay. I have already told my department leaders about this switch.

I think this will be a good switch for me, but am afraid there might be some burned bridges on the way since busy season is about to start and I am one of their star performers. They insist that I stay until busy season is over to make the switch because of the extra work load they will have. The final decision will be up to me, but I don’t want to burn any bridges.

Dear DLR,

First off, let us just congratulate you on the new consulting gig. It’s easier said then done to leave a successful run in one area to try something relatively different (without more DETAILS it’s difficult to know how different your new gig is).

Fortunately for you, your humble editor has some experience with a similar situation. Back in the mid-Aughts, I was granted a transfer from Denver to New York. My transfer was approved in the fall, however the leadership in Denver put forth the condition that I spend one more busy season in the MHC. Looking back on it, I’m glad it worked out that way because I was able to spend one more year working on a client I enjoyed and it better prepared me for my engagements in New York.

In your case, you are switching practices so perhaps you could care less about grinding out another busy season with your tax comrades. Similarly, if you’re the rockstar you claim to be, it probably isn’t too motivating to know that you’re going to bust your ass for 3-ish months but then not have your performance considered for your year-end review.

But you’re obviously torn between your giddiness of a new career opportunity and the possibility of rubbing some people the wrong way if you decide to leave them behind. Honestly, I’m a big believer in doing what you want to do, especially when given the option. So, you shouldn’t be surprised when I say move on to the consulting gig now. I understand that you don’t want to cause any friction but if they are “insisting” that you stay for busy season why did they allow you to make the decision? If they need you so bad, they would “require” you to stay. That’s what Denver did to me but again, their need was probably far greater than New York’s.

But here’s a NEWSFLASH: The team will make it through busy season with or without you. If your colleagues have integrity and support your ambitions, this is a non-issue. Chances are, some of them are completely comfortable no matter what decision you make. Others won’t be. Don’t worry about pleasing everyone because you’ll ultimately fail in that endeavor. If you want to join the consulting team now, then do it. Your tax colleagues will survive and if some of them hold it against you, then you’re better off getting the hell away from them. Good luck.

Final Call: Going Concern Reader Survey (Fall 2010)

Look people – I did my best. I told TPTB that reminding you a third time to take our survey would risk irritating them to the point of many of you breaking out in hives. Alas, my warnings have gone unheeded.

I’ve been assured that this will be the last reminder as well as the final chance to win a $500 gift card. So, if you decide to humor us, take the survey and end up winning the prize, it will be worth it. As for the rest of you, well, you can’t win if you don’t participate.

Follow this link to take our survey. As always, your billable/free time is appreciated.

We now return to your regularly scheduled inflammatory nonsense.

Reminder: Going Concern Reader Survey (Fall 2010)

Against my will, TPTB have forced me to remind you that it is imperative that you take our Fall 2010 Survey if you haven’t already.

It’s also been impressed upon me to also re-mention that we are offering you the chance to win a $500 gift card and it also makes you a good American.

Kindly follow this link to take our survey. As always, your time (billable or not) and participation are appreciated.

Thanks!

Going Concern Reader Survey (Fall 2010)

Going Concern readers – TPTB, in their never-ending quest for world domination, have requested that you share some information about yourselves and to give us some feedback on this here site.

I’ve been assured that your answers will only be used for the forces good and that it won’t take up too much of your time.

As a show of our undying appreciation, we are offering you the chance to win a $500 gift card which could come in handy with the holidays coming up and whatnot.

Kindly follow this link to take our survey. Your time and participation are appreciated.

Thanks!

A Little Housekeeping

Afternoon capital market servants. Your regularly scheduled inflammatory nonsense is being interrupted for the rest of the day due to some technical maintenance that I won’t even begin to try and get into. The site should be available during this time and we should be back to a full slate tomorrow but you know how these things go.

We’ll still be here sweating everything out so let us know if anything goes down and we’ll get to it just as soon as we get the all-clear.

In the meantime, Klynveldians can leave some feedback and Deloittians can dust off their résumés. And for the love of everything good and holy, would kill someone at E&Y to make something interesting happen?

Survey: Most People Get Away with Sending Inappropriate Emails

Recent data suggests that most of you sending emails regarding the person most likely to sleep their way to partner, the hot piece of ass that isn’t pulling their weight or a recruit from a certain school that asks less-than flattering questions about your firm, are getting way with passing it along to their friends and/or colleagues.

That being said, it does happen. One in twenty to be precise. Speaking from personal experience, sometimes people are reading your emails, especially if something goes viral within a firm and happens to sneak outside the firm. That’s when TPTB get on the horn and demand that people are held responsible.


Hey, nobody’s perfect right? When my particular reprimand came down, all I could do was laugh and say, “Yep, I did send that. Hell, it’s says “From: Caleb Newquist” right there. It was a bad decision on my part and I understand you have to do what you have to do.” And I moved on. Besides, I wasn’t the only one. It was communicated to me that literally hundreds of people were being reprimanded for forwarding the message so it was largely a damage control project and plenty of people were being told, “Don’t do that again. Ever.”

But for the most part, it sounds like most of your “inappropriate messages” fly beneath the radar, including:

Inappropriate jokes, angry messages sent in the heat of the moment, and scathing email replies forwarded to the wrong people are among some of the email gaffes that have landed office workers in hot water with their employers or clients.

One in five of those questioned said they had sent an inappropriate email in the heat of the moment, while almost a third said they had accidentally hit “reply all” instead of “reply”.

More than one in 10 of the 2,000 people surveyed admitted they had mistakenly sent an email criticising a colleague to the person they were insulting.

So while the Telegraph makes a point to note that 1 out of 20 people have been reprimanded for accidentally saying “God, can you believe the partner’s B.O. today?” in the “heat of the moment” it also shows that 19 people are having a great time sending inappropriate emails and not having any problems at all.

However, if you’ve been caught red-handed sending a dirty joke and/or discussing your booze-fueled business trip that may or may not have involved a party back at the hotel room, and were later asked to explain yourself, we’d love to hear about it below. And of course, send us any and all future inappropriate emails that would be 100% appropriate for these pages.

Not that we’re suggesting that you use your work email in an inappropriate manner. You’re representing your firm after all. Have the common sense to use a different email address.

One in 20 people reprimanded for inappropriate emails [Telegraph]

Tea Party Tax Day Photos

As you’re well aware, some Tea Partiers are out and about today (not everyone stayed at home) and the Mile High City was no exception.

Being in close proximity to the Capitol, I decided to run over and check out the festivities. While it was definitely a raucous (yet peaceful) bunch they didn’t seem to mind that I wasn’t listening and was obviously more interested in sociological aspects of the gathering.

With the crowd oblivious to my mission, I was able to snap a few pics (yes, total amateur hour) of some of the more, shall we say, interesting signs.


[caption id="attachment_8580" align="alignright" width="260" caption="Child exploitation!"][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_8575" align="aligncenter" width="560" caption="Creative Algebra"][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_8566" align="aligncenter" width="560" caption="Obvious stencil job on the hammer and sickle"][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_8582" align="aligncenter" width="560" caption="Does anyone else find unnecessary quotation marks annoying?"][/caption]